Show me the money

Así se titula el último informe público de Bill Gross en la página de Janus Capital.

Les dejamos el artículo porqué no tiene desperdicio (más abajo en castellano):

"School days" inexorably continue at the Gross household, not just because of grandchildren, but because of the necessity to teach my own kids the complexities and pitfalls of investing. As I get older, I fear I may unduly introduce them to a 1930s Will Rogers warning about losing money: "I'm not so much concerned about the return on my money," he wrote, "but the return of my money." "Don't lose it" is my first and most important conceptual lesson for them despite the Trump bull market and the current "animal spirits" that encourage risk, as opposed to the preservation of capital.

Recently I also explored with them the concept of financial leverage – specifically that of fractional reserve banking, which has been the basis of credit and real economic growth since the system was blessed by central banks over a century ago. "It still mystifies me," I told them, "how a banking system can create money out of thin air, but it does." By rough estimates, banks and their shadows have turned $3 trillion of "base" credit into $65 trillion + of "unreserved" credit in the United States alone – Treasuries, munis, bank loans, mortgages and stocks too, although equities are not officially "credit" they are still dependent on the cash flow that supports the system.

But I jump ahead of myself. "Pretend," I told the "fam" huddled around the kitchen table, that there is only one dollar and that you own it and have it on deposit with the Bank of USA – the only bank in the country. The bank owes you a buck any time you want to withdraw it. But the bank says to itself, "she probably won't need this buck for a while, so I'll lend it to Joe who wants to start a pizza store." Joe borrows the buck and pays for flour, pepperoni and a pizza oven from Sally's Pizza Supplies, who then deposits it back in the same bank in their checking account. Your one and only buck has now turned into two. You have a bank account with one buck and Sally's Pizza has a checking account with one buck. Both parties have confidence that their buck is actually theirs, even though there's really only one buck in the bank's vault.

The bank itself has doubled its assets and liabilities. Its assets are the one buck in its vault and the loan to Joe; its liabilities are the buck it owes to you – the original depositor – and the buck it owes to Sally's Pizza. The cycle goes on of course, lending and relending the simple solitary dollar bill (with regulatory reserve requirements) until like a magician with a wand and a black hat, the fractional reserve system pulls five or six rabbits out of a single top hat. There still is only one dollar bill but fractional reserve banking has turned it into five or six dollars of credit and engineered a capitalistic miracle of growth and job creation. And importantly, all lenders of credit believe that they can sell or liquidate their assets and receive the single solitary buck that rests in the bank's vault. Well . . . not really.

"And so," my oldest son, Jeff, said as he stroked his beardless chin like a scientist just discovering the mystery of black holes. "That sounds like a good thing. The problem I'll bet comes when there are too many pizza stores (think subprime mortgages) and the interest on all of the loans couldn't be paid and everyone wants the dollar back that they think is theirs. Sounds like 2008 to me – something like Lehman Brothers." "Yep," I said, as I got up to get a Coke from the refrigerator. "Something like Lehman Brothers."

In the U.S., credit of $65 trillion is roughly 350% of annual GDP and the ratio is rising. In China, the ratio has more than doubled in the past decade to nearly 300%.

My lesson continued but the crux of it was that in 2017, the global economy has created more credit relative to GDP than that at the beginning of 2008's disaster. In the U.S., credit of $65 trillion is roughly 350% of annual GDP and the ratio is rising. In China, the ratio has more than doubled in the past decade to nearly 300%. Since 2007, China has added $24 trillion worth of debt to its collective balance sheet. Over the same period, the U.S. and Europe only added $12 trillion each. Capitalism, with its adopted fractional reserve banking system, depends on credit expansion and the printing of additional reserves by central banks, which in turn are re-lent by private banks to create pizza stores, cell phones and a myriad of other products and business enterprises. But the credit creation has limits and the cost of credit (interest rates) must be carefully monitored so that borrowers (think subprime) can pay back the monthly servicing costs. If rates are too high (and credit as a % of GDP too high as well), then potential Lehman black swans can occur. On the other hand, if rates are too low (and credit as a % of GDP declines), then the system breaks down, as savers, pension funds and insurance companies become unable to earn a rate of return high enough to match and service their liabilities.

It happened in 2008, and central banks were in a position to drastically lower yields and buy trillions of dollars via QE to prevent a run on the system. Today, central bank flexibility is not what it was back then. Yields globally are near zero and in many cases, negative.

Central banks attempt to walk this fine line – generating mild credit growth that matches nominal GDP growth – and keeping the cost of the credit at a yield that is not too high, nor too low, but just right. Janet Yellen is a modern day Goldilocks.

How is she doing? So far, so good, I suppose. While the recovery has been weak by historical standards, banks and corporations have recapitalized, job growth has been steady and importantly – at least to the Fed – markets are in record territory, suggesting happier days ahead. But our highly levered financial system is like a truckload of nitro glycerin on a bumpy road. One mistake can set off a credit implosion where holders of stocks, high yield bonds, and yes, subprime mortgages all rush to the bank to claim its one and only dollar in the vault. It happened in 2008, and central banks were in a position to drastically lower yields and buy trillions of dollars via Quantitative Easing (QE) to prevent a run on the system. Today, central bank flexibility is not what it was back then. Yields globally are near zero and in many cases, negative. Continuing QE programs by central banks are approaching limits as they buy up more and more existing debt, threatening repo markets and the day to day functioning of financial commerce.

I'm with Will Rogers. Don't be allured by the Trump mirage of 3-4% growth and the magical benefits of tax cuts and deregulation. The U.S. and indeed the global economy is walking a fine line due to increasing leverage and the potential for too high (or too low) interest rates to wreak havoc on an increasingly stressed financial system. Be more concerned about the return of your money than the return on your money in 2017 and beyond."

Pueden consultar el artículo original aquí.

También les dejamos la traducción al castellano de "google translate":

"Los "días escolares" continúan inexorablemente en el hogar de Gross, no sólo por los nietos, sino por la necesidad de enseñar a mis propios hijos las complejidades y las dificultades de invertir. A medida que envejezco, me temo que puedo presentarlos indebidamente a los años treinta Will Rogers advirtiendo sobre la pérdida de dinero: "No estoy tan preocupado por el retorno de mi dinero", escribió, "sino por la devolución de mi dinero". "No lo pierdas" es mi primera y más importante lección conceptual para ellos a pesar del mercado alcista de Trump y los "espíritus animales" actuales que alientan el riesgo, en contraposición a la preservación del capital.

Recientemente también exploré con ellos el concepto de apalancamiento financiero -especialmente el de la banca fraccionaria, que ha sido la base del crédito y el crecimiento económico real desde que el sistema fue bendecido por los bancos centrales hace más de un siglo. "Todavía me desconcierta", les dije, "cómo un sistema bancario puede crear dinero de la nada, pero lo hace". Según cálculos aproximados, los bancos y sus sombras han convertido $ 3 trillones de crédito "base" en $ 65 billones + de crédito "sin reservas" solo en Estados Unidos - bonos, munis, préstamos bancarios, hipotecas y acciones, Crédito "siguen dependiendo del flujo de caja que soporta el sistema.

Pero salto delante de mí. "Finge", le dije a la "fam" acurrucada alrededor de la mesa de la cocina, que sólo hay un dólar y que usted lo posee y lo tiene en depósito con el Banco de EE.UU. - el único banco en el país. El banco le debe un dólar en cualquier momento que desee retirarlo. Pero el banco se dice a sí mismo, "probablemente no necesitará este dinero por un tiempo, así que lo prestaré a Joe, que quiere abrir una tienda de pizzas". Joe toma prestado dinero y paga por harina, pepperoni y un horno de pizza de Sally's Pizza Supplies, que luego lo deposita de nuevo en el mismo banco en su cuenta de cheques. Tu única y única moneda se ha convertido en dos. Usted tiene una cuenta bancaria con un dólar y Sally's Pizza tiene una cuenta corriente con un dólar. Ambas partes tienen confianza en que su dinero es en realidad de ellos, a pesar de que en realidad sólo hay un dólar en la bóveda del banco.

El propio banco ha duplicado sus activos y pasivos. Sus activos son el único dólar en su bóveda y el préstamo a Joe; Sus pasivos son el dinero que le debe a usted - el depositante original - y el dinero que debe a Sally's Pizza. El ciclo sigue, por supuesto, el préstamo y el reenvío de la simple cuenta de dólar solitario (con los requisitos de reserva reglamentaria) hasta que al igual que un mago con una varita y un sombrero negro, el sistema de reserva fraccional extrae cinco o seis conejos de un solo sombrero. Todavía hay un billete de un dólar, pero la banca de reserva fraccionaria lo ha convertido en cinco o seis dólares de crédito y ha diseñado un milagro capitalista de crecimiento y creación de empleo. Y lo que es más importante, todos los prestamistas de crédito creen que pueden vender o liquidar sus activos y recibir el único dólar solitario que descansa en la bóveda del banco. Bien . . . realmente no.

-Y así -dijo mi hijo mayor, Jeff, mientras acariciaba su barbilla sin barba como un científico que acaba de descubrir el misterio de los agujeros negros. El problema apuesto a que hay demasiadas pizzerías (creo que las hipotecas subprime) y el interés en todos los préstamos no se puede pagar y todo el mundo quiere que el dólar de vuelta que creen que es Suena como 2008 para mí - algo así como Lehman Brothers. " "Sí," dije, mientras me levantaba para conseguir una Coca-Cola de la nevera. -Algo así como Lehman Brothers.

    En los Estados Unidos, el crédito de $ 65 billones equivale aproximadamente al 350% del PIB anual y la proporción está aumentando. En China, la proporción se ha más que duplicado en la última década a casi el 300%.

Mi lección continuó, pero la clave de ello fue que en 2017, la economía global ha creado más crédito en relación con el PIB que en el inicio del desastre de 2008. En los Estados Unidos, el crédito de $ 65 billones equivale aproximadamente al 350% del PIB anual y la proporción está aumentando. En China, la proporción se ha más que duplicado en la última década a casi el 300%. Desde 2007, China ha añadido deuda de 24 billones de dólares a su balance colectivo. En el mismo período, los Estados Unidos y Europa sólo añadieron $ 12 billones cada uno. El capitalismo, con su sistema bancario de reserva fraccional adoptado, depende de la expansión del crédito y la impresión de reservas adicionales por los bancos centrales, que a su vez son re-prestados por los bancos privados para crear pizzerías, teléfonos celulares y una miríada de otros productos y empresas . Pero la creación de crédito tiene límites y el costo del crédito (tasas de interés) debe ser cuidadosamente monitoreado para que los prestatarios (creo que subprime) pueden pagar los costos de servicio mensuales. Si las tasas son demasiado altas (y el crédito como un% del PIB demasiado alto también), entonces se pueden producir cisnes negros Lehman potenciales. Por otra parte, si las tasas son demasiado bajas (y el crédito como% del PIB disminuye), entonces el sistema se descompone, ya que los ahorradores, los fondos de pensiones y las compañías de seguros se ven incapaces de obtener una tasa de pasivo.

    Ocurrió "